The Hinckley Slums

The Slum areas of Hinckley, Leicestershire

The poor in Hinckley were housed in unhygienic and overcrowded slums. Terraced cottages were built cheaply during the Victorian period, with few facilities. Water came from a stand pipe in the neighbourhood, which flowed only a few hours in a week. There might be a toilet in a yard serving a group of families. When it overflowed, landlords often turned a blind eye, and the yard filled with sewage. Disease was common. Rows of 'back?to-back' houses were built, with light and air coming only through the front windows and door. No wonder that there were frequent fights among neighbours. Some of the photographs at the bottom of the page show the tenements of the properties within the slum areas of Hinckley, Leicestershire.

In 17-Oct-1873 the Local Board published a report on the dilapidated state of some of the properties in the Slum areas.

11th October 1935 The council announced at a HUDC meeting the following year's slum clearance programme. Areas for clearance were Grove Street, Church Walk, Blockley's Yard, Wightman's Yard, Manor Place and Bell Yard. Our town was changing, although all the proposed slum clearance did not take place the following year as planned.

15th October 1937 The last instalment of the council's slum clearance scheme was discussed by HUDC. The scheme related to 84 houses in Hinckley and 34 in Stoke Golding. The Hinckley houses were in Mill View, Warren's Yard, Lord's Yard, The Crown and Anchor Yard, Trinity Lane, Blue Boar Yard, Moore's Yard, Argyles Yard, Church Walk, Cross Keys Yard, Flavell's Yard, The Lawns, and Waterloo Square.



A list of all the Slum areas in Hinckley.

Anchor Yard

In 1873 the Local Board published a report on the dilapidated state of the properties. The slum properties were finally demolished here in 1937-8


Blue Boar Yard

Typical jitty or yard of 19th century buildings formerly housing homes and frameshops. The slum properties here demolished in 1937-8.


Britannia Yard

In 1873 the Local Board published a report on the dilapidated state of the properties.


Cox's Abbey

Located in the Upper Castle Street area. The slum properties were demolished here in 1932, amongst them was some of the worst housing in the town.


Cross Keys Yard

Located in the Upper Castle Street area. Notable as the birthplace of Nat Langham (1820-1871), who became the bare knuckle-boxing Middleweight Champion of England during in 1843.

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Flavell's Yard

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Fox Yard

A public enquiry was held into the proposals to demolish Fox Yard and White Lion Yard. 'The White Lion and Fox yard properties were certainly more than 100 years old, some of the house may have even been 300 years old as they were old and dilapidated, and it was impossible to say anything in their favour except that in some cases there was good air space. The properties could not be put into a habitable state at a reasonable expense, and along with many cases the only way to deal with them was to pull them down.

The slum properties were demolished here in 1931.


The Lawns

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Lord's Yard

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Moore's Yard

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Warren's Yard

The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.


Waterloo Square

Also known as Cork Hole, the properties are thought to have been built during 1812 just south of town centre. The slum properties were demolished here in 1937-8.





Tip: Click on the i (top-left) on the photo viewer for a description of the photo.

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