Road names of Hinckley

In Hinckley there can be lots of hidden history in road names, ever wondered why a road is called what it is?


Albert Road

Was named after the Prince Albert, the husband of Queen Victoria.



Alma Road

Was formerly called Sawpit Lane, there was a wheel-wright’s yard opposite the factory of S.W. Jennings Ltd on the site of the Council School, where wooden wheels were made.



Baines Lane

Off Lower Bond Street, was formally called Penytes Lane.



Brame Road

Named after Charlotte Mary Brame, the famous local novelist, who died in 1884 aged 48 years. She lived in Castle Street and brought up a family of some seven or eight children, but found time to write no less than eighty novels.



Burleigh Road

On the Council's Middlefield Lane Estate (acquired in the 1930s). Named to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth, fought within a few miles of Hinckley in 1485.



Butt Lane

Shown as Spiers Lane on a map dated 1818 in the Hinckley Towne Chest. The Lady of the Manor of Burbage in 1880 granted the 10th Leicestershire Regiment, Hinckley Rifle Volunteer Corps, use of a part of Burbage Common for rifle shooting and the construction of butts.



Canning Street

Road leading off Trinity Lane, and named after George Canning, who was the 1827 British Prime Minister.



Chessher Street

Road leading off Trinity Lane, and named after Dr. Robert Chessher. He was a noted surgeon, his patients included William Wilberforce and the son of British Prime Minister George Canning.



Clarence Road

Named after the Duke of Clarence, the eldest child of Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII), and the grandson of Queen Victoria.



Cleveland Road

Named after John Cleveland, the famous Royalist poet, the son of a Hinckley Vicar.



Coventry Road

The part of Coventry Road that joins Regent Street, used to be called Rosemary Lane.



De Montfort Road

Named after the 13th Century Earl of Leicester Simon de Montfort, he was also the Baron of Hinckley.



Druid Street

So named as land bordering on it was in the possession of the Ancient Order of Druids.



Duke's Lane

An alley that ran from The Borough to the Market Place in front of the former White Hart Inn, which is now the location of the Lloyds Bank and Yorkshire Bank building.



Forest Road

One of three roads (Woodland Road, Forest Road, Glebe Road) on the London Road Estate, the Hinckley U.D.C. acquired in 1926. Glebe Road passes through a close of land which once belonged to the Hinckley Parish Church, the income was paid to the verger for ringing the curfew bell.



Glebe Road

One of three roads (Woodland Road, Forest Road, Glebe Road) on the London Road Estate, the Hinckley U.D.C. acquired in 1926. Glebe Road passes through a close of land which once belonged to the Hinckley Parish Church, the income was paid to the verger for ringing the curfew bell.



Gopsall Road

This road leads out of Factory Road. The road was named after Gopsall Hall, the residence of Earl Howe.



Granville Road

Named after Lord Granville whose son was a patient of Dr. Robert Chessher in Hinckley. Lord Granville lived for a period at Granville House along Coventry Road (now demolished).



Grims Lane

The part of New Buildings, that is between Castle Street and Stockwell Head.



Hangman's Lane

Off Ashby Road and on the very boundary of the old Parish of Hinckley. Skeletons were disinterred close to this spot, it was possibly some of the Hinckley Assizes (held here instead of Leicester in 1611 where the plague was prevalent) victims were condemned to die by hanging.



Hansom Road

Named after Joseph Aloysius Hansom, who lived for four years in Hinckley, he designed the Hansom Cab, and was the architect for the Birmingham Town Hall, Leicester Museum in New Walk, and the Hinckley Workhouse in London Road, Hinckley.



Hawley Road

At one time was known as New Road (leading form Southfield Road to Rugby Road). Named after Alfred Ernest Hawley, the founder of the Sketchley Dye Works.



Hays Lane

Off Coventry Road on the left hand side going towards Nuneaton and named after John Hays, a former schoolmaster of Hinckley. In 1857 he bequeathed £500 for the purpose of forming a public library for the town, the Charity Trustees invested this sum and it gained £150 interest. In 1871 there were unexpended balances in the Cotton Famine Relief Fund and the Prince of Wales Rejoicing Fund of £150. In 1874 the first public library premises were opened in the Borough (site of former Liggin's shop).



Hollycroft

At one time this was called Hollow Croft. In a Court Roll of 1737 there is an item "Paid for 6 loads of stone to mend Hollow Croft Hill £1. 10. 0.". It was also known as Canning's Walk, due to the daily stroll of George Canning between Burbage and Wykin.



John Nichols Street

On the Jericho Farm Estate of the Hinckley U.D.C. (acquired in 1934 and 1935). John Nicchols was a famous historian who wrote Hinckley of Hinckley, which was published in 1782. Nichol's would later go on to write History and Antiquities of the Town and County of Leicester that would take twenty to thirty years to write. He died in London in 1826 aged 81.



King Richard Road

This was named after King Richard III to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth (fought within a few miles of Hinckley) in 1485.



King George's Way

The main road on the Jericho Farm Estate of the Hinckley U.D.C. (acquired in 1934 and 1935). So named to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of the Coronation of King George V in 1935.



King Street

Mrs. Annie King, and her son John King, entertained the Rev. John Wesley in King Street when he came to Hinckley to open the first Methodist Chapel on 27th March 1783. Wesley records in his Journal: "Preached in the evening in the neat elegant preaching house; so I did on the following days to a serious and well-behaved people".



Manor Street

Named after the old Manor House (now demolished) on the corner of Upper Bond Street and Hollycroft, currently the site of the Police Station that was built in 1935.



Mansion Street

Between The Borough and Trinity Lane, it was formerly called Hog Lane due to pigs and hogs that were sold there on market days.



Nutts Lane

Leading from Coventry Road (by The Wharf Inn) to Watling Street. Named after Dr. Joseph Nutt, a local apothecary who died in October 1775.



Queen's Road

Named after Queen Victoria who reigned from 20th June 1837 to 22nd January 1901. Her reign of 63 years and seven months would become known as the Victorian era.



Radmore Road

On the Council's Middlefield Lane Estate (acquired in the 1930s). Named to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth, fought within a few miles of Hinckley in 1485.



Richmond Road

On the Council's Middlefield Lane Estate (acquired in the 1930s). Named to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth, fought within a few miles of Hinckley in 1485.



Rosemary Way

Named after Rosemary Way, the first part of Coventry Road from Regent Street to Trinity Lane.



Shakespeare Drive

Road that leads from Hollycroft to Canning Street, named after William Shakespeare after the purchase of Hollycroft Park by the Hinckley U.D.C in 1931. In 'Henry IV' Act 5, Justice Shallow is asked of his man Davy, whether he means to stop any of William's wages about the sack he lost the other day at Hinckley Fair.



Spa Lane

The name is from Christopher's Spa near the site of the present Bowling Green in Bowling Green Road.



Stanley Road

On the Council's Middlefield Lane Estate (acquired in the 1930s). Named to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth, fought within a few miles of Hinckley in 1485.



Teign Bank Road

Named after Teign Bank House in Middlefield Lane which was afterwards called Middlefield House (now demolished) where Mr. Arthur Atkins was born. He was the father of Mr. Shirley Atkins and his three brothers - John, Thomas and Hugh - who in 1888 erected a Library in Station Road and presented it to the town in his memory.



The Grove

Once called Grove Street and Grove Street Square which contains a block of sixteen flats. The name comes from a grove which existed near the site. Nearby, there also used to be a winding walk called Lover's Walk which was on the site of Clarendon Road.



The Horsefair

Between Station Road and Regent Street, on the site of what is shown on the 1782 map in John Nichol's History of Hinckley, as Westminster Walk.



Thorneycroft Road

Was called Mount Lane, Thorneycroft Road took its name from 'Thorneycroft' house (now demolished) off Priesthills Road, which was the residence of Mr. Shirley Atkins, Clerk of the Hinckley U.D.C.



Tudor Road

On the Council's Middlefield Lane Estate (acquired in the 1930s). Named to recall the Wars of the Roses and the Battle of Bosworth, fought within a few miles of Hinckley in 1485.



William Iliffe Street

On the Jericho Farm Estate of the Hinckley U.D.C. (acquired in 1934 and 1935). Named after William Iliffe, who introduced the stocking-frame into Hinckley in 1640, marking the beginning of the hosiery and knitwear trade in Hinckley.



Willowbank Road

Off Rugby Road, was once originally called Melancholy Lane.



Woodland Road

One of three roads (Woodland Road, Forest Road, Glebe Road) on the London Road Estate, the Hinckley U.D.C. acquired in 1926. Glebe Road passes through a close of land which once belonged to the Hinckley Parish Church, the income was paid to the verger for ringing the curfew bell.


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